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West Coast Collaborative: Public-private partnership to reduce diesel emissions
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Pacific Merchant Shipping Association
February 22, 2007
PMSA
Sponsored Legislation – California – Assembly Bill 846

PMSA is sponsoring a bill in the 2007/2008 California legislative session,
Assembly Bill 846. The bill provides a sales tax exemption
for the purchase and consumption of residual fuel of 1.5% sulfur
content or less and/or marine distillate fuel with sulfur content of
0.05% or less. For more information, contact Pacific Merchant Shipping
Association, 250 Montgomery Street, Suite 700, San Francisco, CA
94104, (415) 352-0710.

Valley VoiceValley
Voice
Newspaper
Jan. 22, 2007
Biofuel Boomtime: State Decision Expected to Mean 75% Increase
in Ethanol Use in California

Fresno BeeThe
Fresno
Bee
November 16, 2006
6 Dairies to Sell Manure
for Energy

PG&E will take natural
gas methane digesters produce.

Inside Bay AreaInside Bay Area
Dec. 5, 2006
Shipping Giant to Test New Fuel
The shipping industry’s recent push to show California residents
it’s serious about reducing air pollution continued Monday as shipping
giant APL announced changes to the way it burns fuel. Prompted by
new state regulations that will mandate what fuel can be burned while
traversing California waterways, the Oakland-based company said it
now has low-sulfur fuel aboard all 23 of its ships that dock at state
ports. But in hopes of jumping ahead of future regulations, and to
show that the "industry needs to be responsible," the company
also launched a pilot project to test three other technologies it
says will reduce ship emissions.

Vida en el ValleVida en el Valle
Nov. 22, 2006
Parents Push for Cleaner Air
Every time Margarita Guzmán sees a diesel truck speed on Highway
99 not far from her home, she begins to cringe. The mother of four
worries that her children, including two who attend nearby Addams
Elementary School, will develop asthma from all the toxic smog and
soot left behind.

Port of Long Beach
May 31, 2006
Breakthrough Clean Air System to be Tested
Pilot dockside treatment
technology could cut 95% of air pollutants from ships. The Port of
Long Beach is reviewing an application by a terminal operator to
conduct the first full-blown test of a dockside system that could
treat air emissions from ships at berth, reducing a major source
of pollutants by more than 95 percent.  Metropolitan
Stevedoring Co., which operates the Pier G bulk cargo terminal
in Long Beach, has partnered with Advanced Cleanup Technologies
Inc. to develop a pilot project to test ACTI’s dockside emissions
treatment system at one berth. They are seeking Port development
permits to begin construction as early as this fall. The Port
is currently preparing an environmental analysis of the project
and the South Coast Air Quality Management District is evaluating
the air quality benefits.

San Diego Union Tribune
March 23, 2006
Emissions
Program Shifts to High Gear: County Installing Smog-Cutting Devices on Mexican
Big Rigs

One truck at a time, San Diego County air pollution officials are trying to cut
the smog-forming particles spewed by old Mexican big rigs that cross the international
border. By installing pollution-control devices on these vehicles at no
cost to the owners, the pilot program promises to reduce each truck’s output
of toxic air contaminants by up to 50 percent. Now, the work is at a crossroads.

WestStartWestStart
EPA Announces
$3 million Collaborative Diesel Emissions Reductions RFP Due March
23

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has announced the availability
of $3 million in grant monies for projects aimed at reducing diesel
emissions in Alaska, Arizona, California, Hawaii, Idaho, Nevada, Oregon
or Washington. The grant program is part of the West Coast Collaborative
which has awarded more than $2.6 million in grants for 28 projects
since 2004. This year the agency expects to award up to 12 grants ranging
from $50,000 to $500,000.

ExtengineExtengine
(Fullerton, CA)

Can Canola Biodiesel Help to Clean
the Air in the San Joaquin Valley?

We’ll find out! EPA’s Region 9 office in San Francisco has approved a demonstration
of Extengine’s TruBlue® low-NOx Biodiesel fuel in farm equipment in
the San Joaquin Valley (SJV), which, by several criteria, has the worst air quality
in the United States. Sustainable Conservation, the San Francisco-based organization
that engages businesses and private landowners in conservation, is partnering
with Extengine in this project, which will evaluate TruBlue, a premium low-NOx
biodiesel blend, in specified biodiesel blends to assess air quality benefits
and provide an innovative approach to diesel emission reduction.

Friends of the EarthFriends of the Earth
Thursday, September 15, 2005
New
$100,000 Air Pollution Grant will Help Clear Bay Area Skies of Cruise Ship Smokestack
Exhaust

US EPA funds Port of San Francisco’s new incentive program for
cruise ships to burn cleaner marine fuels in the Bay for one year
San Francisco, CA – Burning cleaner marine fuels could become
routine for cruise ships calling on the Port of San Francisco as
a result of a $100,000 air pollution grant awarded today by the U.
S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Bluewater NetworkBluewater Network
Thursday, September 15, 2005
New
$100,000 Air Pollution Grant will Help Clear Bay Area Skies of Cruise Ship Smokestack
Exhaust

San Francisco, CA – Burning cleaner marine fuels could become
routine for cruise ships calling on the Port of San Francisco as a
result of a $100,000 air pollution grant awarded today by the U. S.
Environmental Protection Agency. The port will use the money to reduce
docking fees on cruise ships that switch to cleaner-burning marine
fuels while in the Bay. The one-year project will reduce harmful diesel
exhaust emissions from cruise ship smokestacks by as much as 10 tons
per cruise ship for the season.

BulktransporterBulktransporter
Friday, August 25, 2005
EPA Grant to Help
Curb Diesel Pollution

An Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) grant of $1.4 million to
help curb diesel pollution has been awarded for the West Coast.

Green Diesel TechGreen Diesel Technology
Thursday, August 24, 2005
EPA
NEWS: $1.4 Million Awarded to Help Reduce Diesel Pollution on West Coast

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Stephen L. Johnson
today announced $1.4 million in diesel grants. The EPA grants will
help leverage over $5.8 million in matching funds to curb diesel
pollution as part of the West Coast Collaborative.

Energy Saving TrustEnergy Saving Trust
Thursday, August 24, 2005
EPA
Launches Clean Diesel Grants

The Environmental Protection Agency in the US has announced grants
totaling $1.4 million for projects to reduce diesel emissions in
California, Oregon and Washington. Of that money, $211,000 will be
awarded to Cleaire Advanced Emission Controls to develop a demonstration
project that will lower emissions from heavy construction equipment.

Platinum TodayPlatinum Today
Thursday, August 24, 2005
EPA
Launches Clean Diesel Grants

The Environmental Protection Agency in the US has announced grants
totaling $1.4 million for projects to reduce diesel emissions in
California, Oregon and Washington.

Business WireBusinesswire.com
Tuesday, August 23, 2005
Cleaire
Division of Cummins West Awarded EPA Grant to Provide Emission-Reducing Technologies
in California; Demonstration Project to Retrofit Heavy Construction Equipment;
Evaluate Results

Cleaire Advanced Emission Controls, a division of Cummins West Inc.,
is part of a team that has received a $211,000 grant from the Environmental
Protection Agency for a demonstration project designed to lower emissions
on heavy construction equipment in California.

CumminsCummins
Tuesday, August 23, 2005
Cleaire
Division of Cummins West Awarded EPA Grant to Provide Emission-Reducing Technologies
in California

COLUMBUS, IND. – Cleaire Advanced Emission Controls, a division of
Cummins West Inc., is part of team that has received a $211,000 grant
from the Environmental Protection Agency for a demonstration project
designed to lower emissions on heavy construction equipment in California.

FinanzenFinanzen.net
Tuesday, August 23, 2005
Cleaire
Division of Cummins West Awarded EPA Grant to Provide Emission-Reducing Technologies
in California; Demonstration Project to Retrofit Heavy Construction Equipment;
Evaluate Results

Cleaire Advanced Emission Controls, a division of Cummins West Inc.,
is part of a team that has received a $211,000 grant from the Environmental
Protection Agency for a demonstration project designed to lower emissions
on heavy construction equipment in California.

AmeriscanAmeriScan
Monday, August 22, 2005
$1.4
Million Awarded to Cut Diesel Pollution on West Coast

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Stephen
Johnson has been traveling out west and came to West Sacramento today
with $1.4 million to offer for grants to reduce diesel emissions.
Johnson made the funding announcement at the offices of diesel engine
distributor Cummins West.

CBSCBS5.com – Bay City News Wire
Monday, August 22, 2005
EPA
Issues $1.4 Million in Grants to Combat Diesel Pollution

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is issuing $1.4 million
in grant money to curb diesel pollution, EPA administrator Stephen
Johnson said today. The grants will help leverage more than $5.8
million in matching funds as part of the West Coast Collaborative,
a partnership between government leaders, environmental groups and
the private sector.

WasteNewsWasteNews
Monday, August 22, 2005
EPA
Awards $1.4 Million in Grants to Cut Diesel Emissions

The Environmental Protection Agency announced Aug. 22 that it would
award $1.4 million in grants to reduce diesel emissions. The grants
will help leverage more than $5.8 million in matching funds to curb
diesel pollution in the western United States, according to the EPA.

Yuba NetYubaNet.com
Monday, August 22, 2005
$1.4
Million Awarded to Help Reduce Diesel Pollution on West Coast Announcement Includes
$211,000 for Sacramento Metropolitan Air

$1.4 Million Awarded to Help Reduce Diesel Pollution on West Announcement
in includes $211,000 for Sacramento Metropolitan Air By: U.S. Environmental
Protection Agency. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Administrator
Stephen L. Johnson today announced $1.4 million in diesel grants.
The EPA grants will help leverage over $5.8 million in matching funds
to curb diesel pollution as part of the West Coast Collaborative.

Fresno BeeFresno Bee (and Modesto Bee)
October 3, 2004
Editorial:
Cleaning up diesels

The Fresno Bee ran an editorial yesterday on the recent
rollout of the West Coast Diesel Emission Reduction Collaborative
and the funds that will go toward reducing diesel emissions from
locomotives, however they state that there are concerns that
in the initial phase none of the money will go to fix farm equipment
— one of the urgent needs in the Valley.

Friday, October 1, 2004
Railroads
Get Grants To Help Clean The Air

A
$75,000 grant
to upgrade aging diesel
locomotives in the San Joaquin
Valley is only the beginning
of a voluntary program to
help clean up the sooty
air, say federal environmental
officials. "We’re really trying to use it
to build momentum," said Kerry Drake, associate director of the U.S. Environmental
Protection Agency in San Francisco. The grant to Union Pacific and to Burlington
Northern and Santa Fe Railway is part of $6 million in West Coast voluntary emission
reduction projects that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced Thursday.
None of the funding so far relates to agriculture, a prime source of the valley’s
pollution.

LA TimesLos Angeles Times – Burbank Leader
Saturday,
October 2, 2004

Plugged in
to Air Pollution

After spending some time studying the air quality around
Horace Mann Elementary School in Glendale, Jerome Rizalado, 10,
hopes that the adults around him will develop the same convictions
he has about pollution. After learning about deforestation and
the shrinking of animal habitats, Jerome has adopted a new philosophy. "Now I pick up trash. Before, when I was
in a hurry, I sometimes threw it on the floor, but now I pick it up," Jerome
declared Thursday. "I want to conserve. I want to be a good man—or,
a good boy." Jerome was one of dozens of Mann Elementary School fourth-
and fifth-grade students present when Supervisor Michael D. Antonovich, along
with representatives from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the
South Coast Air Quality Management District, announced the launch of a new
project aimed at reducing pollution along the Golden State (5) Freeway emitted
by idling big-rig trucks.

Monterey HeraldThe Monterey (CA) Herald
Thursday, September 30, 2004
News Briefs
Air quality officials are spending $200,000 for 20 electrical hookups
at Southern California truck stops so truckers won’t have to idle
pollution-spewing diesel big-rigs during breaks. It’s part of a new U.S.
Environmental Protection Agency program designed to get West Coast industries
to cut unhealthy diesel pollution. The EPA and South Coast Air Quality Management
District are sharing the cost of the plug-ins. "We have a tremendous amount of diesel traffic
and a tremendous amount of older equipment. The goal is to replace older engines
with newer engines," regional EPA administrator Wayne Nastri said.

South Coast Air Quality Management DistrictSouth Coast Air Quality Management District
Thursday,
September 30, 2004

Press
Release: AQMD, EPA Announce Project to Cut Truck Idling, Emissions

Southland and federal air quality officials today announced
the region’s first project to reduce toxic diesel emissions from idling
big-rig trucks by providing “plug-in” power at a truck stop along
Interstate 5. “Long-haul truckers often idle their rigs for up to eight
hours at a time to power their cabs while they rest — wasting fuel and producing
unnecessary toxic diesel emissions,” said Michael D. Antonovich,
a Los Angeles County Supervisor and member of the South Coast Air
Quality Management District Governing Board.

Bluewater NetworkBluewater Network
Thursday, September 30, 2004
Press
Release – New Federal Air Pollution Initiative Will Help Reduce Ferry
Exhaust on
San
Francisco Bay

New funding program could help advance clean ferry projects – Clean
ferries could become the standard for San Francisco Bay and the West
Coast with help from a new federal air pollution initiative announced
today by the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency. The goal is to
secure $100 million per year beginning in 2006 to help replace or
retrofit dirty diesel engines on vessels, trains and trucks. “The
ferry fleet can leverage this money to build the cleanest ferries
ever,” said Teri Shore of Bluewater Network, which advocates
for clean vessels, cars and trucks. “The grants should go toward
best available technology and alternative-fueled vessels to get the
best bang for the buck.” 

ICANThe Integrated Chamber Advocacy Network (ICAN) – Sacramento
CA
Thursday, September 30, 2004
SAC
Region Receives EPA Grant to “Spare the Air”

The U.S. EPA joined with a consortium of federal, state
and local government agencies, non-profits and industry to kick
off an unprecedented effort to reduce diesel emissions from trucks,
ships, locomotives and other diesel sources along the West Coast.
Organized as the West Coast Diesel Emissions Reductions Collaborative,
more than 400 interests are working together to find voluntary
solutions, incentives and shared approaches to reducing diesel
pollution in California, Oregon, Washington and Alaska sooner than
federally mandated deadlines. This has been a consistent position
advocated by the Metro Chamber’s Cap to Cap Air Quality team
for the past several years.

San Jose Mercury NewsThe San Jose Mercury News
Thursday, September 30, 2004
U.S. Unveils Effort to Cut Diesel Soot
EPA Seeks $500 million to reduce air pollutant on West Coast. Seeking
quicker reductions of the type of smog most harmful to public health,
the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Wednesday announced a partnership
between 400 government agencies, environmental organizations and
private business groups to cut diesel soot in California, Oregon, Washington
and Alaska. EPA officials in San Francisco unveiled $6 million in grants and
loans. They said they hope the West Coast Diesel Collaborative will secure
$100 million a year in federal funding over the next five years, reducing
by 8,000 tons a year diesel particles spewing into West Coast air. “Diesel
engines are very long-lived,” said Wayne Nastri, regional EPA administrator
in San Francisco. “The question is, how do we accelerate the turnover to
cleaner engines?”

Press EnterprisePress-Enterprise (Inland Southern California)
Thursday, September 30, 2004
EPA
Plans New Effort on Diesel Pollution

It will team with Canada, Mexico and other agencies to target the
dirtiest engines. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency officials
announced Wednesday that they hope to corral $100 million a year in federal
money to spur voluntary efforts to cut diesel pollution along the West Coast.
The EPA will work with Mexico, Canada, state governments and local air pollution
agencies to cut emissions from diesel-powered trucks, boats, locomotives
and farm machinery, said Wayne Nastri, the EPA’s administrator for the Pacific
Southwest Region.

LA Daily NewsLos Angeles CA Daily News.com
Wednesday, September 29, 2004
Plan
to Roll Back Diesel Emissions

Air quality regulators said Wednesday they plan to spend $200,000
to install 20 electrical sockets at Castaic and Interstate 5 truck
stops so truckers won’t have to idle their pollution-spewing diesel engines
on breaks. The money comes from a new U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
program designed to get West Coast industries to cut unhealthy diesel pollution
from ships, railroads and trucks sooner than regulations require.

San Diego Union TribuneSan Diego Union Tribune
Wednesday, September 29,
2004

EPA Launches Partnership to Clean up West Coast Diesel Emissions
Environmental officials launched a partnership with industry
Wednesday to curb cancer-causing diesel emissions spewing into
the West Coast’s skies. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
announced $6 million worth of voluntary projects in California,
Oregon and Washington, with most of the money coming from the federal
government. The EPA said it hoped to ultimately secure $100 million
over five years for future projects. "The goal is to replace
the older engines with newer equipment, newer fuels and get that done as
soon as possible," said Wayne Nastri, EPA’s administrator for the Pacific
region. "It benefits all of us, those at the border and up and down
the state."

North County TimesNorth County Times (San Diego CA)
Wednesday, September 29, 2004
Air
Pollution District Gets $150K Grant

The San Diego County Air Pollution Control District was awarded a
$150,000 grant Wednesday by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to participate
in the start of a diesel emissions reduction program. The money will enable
officials to investigate the costs and effectiveness of diesel retrofit technologies
on heavy-duty vehicles that operate in the San Diego and Tijuana region. The
goal of the program is to reduce diesel emissions from trucks, ships, locomotives
and other sources along the West Coast from Mexico to Alaska, and to accomplish
the goal faster than is federally mandated.

   
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