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West Coast Collaborative: Public-private partnership to reduce diesel emissions
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Puget Sound Business Journal
November 17, 2006      
Op-Ed: Consumers are the next front for cleaning the air
By Dennis McLerran, Executive Director, Puget Sound Clean Air Agency and Marina
Cofer-Wildsmith, CEO, American Lung Association of Washington.
New federal air quality standards for fine particles announced recently by the
Environmental Protection Agency could cause several areas in our region to violate
those standards and move into non-attainment status for the first time since1993.  Urban
areas of our region have air toxics levels that are in the top five percent nationally.
And we are concerned about global climate change. 

KPLUKPLU
November 16, 2006
Expanding the Hybrid Work Truck Fleet
Hybrid passenger cars such as the Toyota
Prius have become common. Now, the feds are giving local governments money to
put that green technology into heavy work trucks. KPLU environment reporter Liam
Moriarty has more. Interview withPeter Murchie.

King County

Text
and Video of "King County among first in nation to order
hybrid trucks"

Seattle PISeattle Post-Intelligencer
Thursday, November 16, 2006
Grant Given to Buy Hybrid Utility Trucks
Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Stephen Johnson
delivered a $250,000 grant Wednesday to a consortium of Western
Washington governments to buy "ultraclean" hybrid diesel-electric
utility trucks. Led by King County, the group of 12 cities and counties
and the state Department of Natural Resources will kick in $1.5 million
to buy the trucks, which are the kind that have been busy recently
fixing power outages caused by storms.

Daily Journal of CommerceDaily Journal of Commerce
November 15, 2006
EPA helps utilities buy hybrid trucks
SEATTLE — The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is giving
a group of local governments $250,000 to help defray the cost of
10 state-of-the-art hybrid electric utility trucks. The trucks cost
$1.7 million. International Harvester built the chassis and engines
of the trucks; Eaton Corp. built the hybrid components. The governments
getting the EPA grant — which include the cities
of Seattle, Tacoma, Kent, Richland, Bremerton and Everett — will
pay for most of the cost of the trucks.
EPA Administrator Stephen Johnson will appear at a ceremony today
in Georgetown to award the clean diesel grant.
The event will take place at 1 p.m. at the King County Fleet Maintenance
Facility, 707 S. Orcas St.

Auto SpectatorAuto Spectator
November 15, 2006
Grant Helps King County and NW Partners Purchase Newest, Cleanest
Hybrid Diesel-Electric Utility Trucks

Today EPA’s Administrator Stephen L. Johnson awarded $250,000
to King County and a consortium of 13 other Washington cities and
counties to help launch an innovative program to purchase ultra-clean
hybrid diesel-electric utility trucks and greatly reduce harmful diesel
emissions in the Northwest.

Seattle PISeattle Post Intelligencer
March 14, 2006
EPA
Helps Gig harbor Buy School Buses

A $300,000 grant from the Environmental Protection Agency will help pay for eight
new school buses next year for the Peninsula School District at Gig Harbor.

Renewable Energy AccessRenewable
Energy Access

Friday, November 4, 2005
Biodiesel
for Both Sides of the Border

Thanks to a $69,777 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency grant, the
Washington Technology Center’s Northwest Energy Technology Collaborative
will launch a project to convert waste vegetable oil into biodiesel
fuel for utility line trucks that operate along both sides of the
U.S./Canadian Border.

Bellingham HeraldBellingham Herald
Monday, October 31, 2005
Biodiesel
Plan Spans Border

A $70,000 grant from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is
paying for the Bio-49 project until September 2006. The trucks should
be using the fuel as soon as January.

Washington State:  Innovation Is Our futureWashington State:
Innovation is in Our Nature

Friday, September 30, 2005
New
Cross-Border Bio-Diesel Project Converts

Bio49 is a response
to the EPA’s “West Coast Collaborative,” an
initiative working to reduce diesel air pollution. The project derives
its name from the 49th parallel latitude that crosses the U.S-Canada
border near Washington state and British Columbia. The EPA grant,
along with matching funds totaling $280,000, will be used to launch
and fund the Bio49 project for one year.

Port of SeattlePort of Seattle
July 23, 2005
Cruise
Ships Plug In to Shore Power at Port of Seattle

New equipment that allows two of the nine cruise ships calling at
the Port of Seattle this season to plug into shore power means
the vessels can turn their engines off while docked, reducing cruise ship
air emissions by about 30 percent.

"Seattle is one of just two ports in North America with shore
power capability for cruise ships," said Port of Seattle Commission
President Bob Edwards. "The
reduction in emissions is equal to taking 1,100 cars of the road
for a full year."

Offering shore power is possible in Seattle because Princess Cruises
invested $1.8 million to build the Diamond Princess and Sapphire
Princess with that capability and because Seattle City Light was
willing to work with Princess and the Port to bring power to the
terminal. City Light’s capital costs were offset in part by a $50,000
grant from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.  

Seattle TimesSeattle Times
Saturday, July 23, 2005
2
cruise ships will plug into Seattle’s power grid

Beginning today, two Princess Cruises ships will reduce their air-pollution
emissions by about 30 percent by shutting down their diesel engines while
docked in Seattle. Instead of idling or using generator power, the Diamond
Princess and Sapphire Princess will plug into the city’s power grid and run
off electricity.

Seattle PISeattle Post-Intelligencer Editorial Board
Monday,
October 4, 2004

A
Diesel Reprieve

Diesel emissions constitute some of the biggest air
pollution threats to health. The problem is finally receiving
much-needed attention around Puget Sound and along the West Coast.
Last week, officials announced that a cruise ship line will turn
off diesel engines on two of its ships while in port and plug
into dockside electric outlets. That means fewer particulates
and cancer-causing toxins in the air. The federal Environmental Protection
Agency is giving $50,000 to Seattle City Light for necessary equipment
purchases. The EPA, a host of private groups and states, including
Washington, are engaged in a West Coast diesel initiative to
cut pollution. And the Bush administration has enacted strong
new national rules on diesel. The coast initiative is vital.
Western port cities face serious challenges in reducing diesel
emissions from concentrated ship, railroad and trucking sources.
Through wide-ranging cooperation, jobs can expand at the same
time that health improves. 

World Wide ShipperWorld Wide Shipper
Monday, October 4, 2004
Port of Vancouver,
BC—Testing Low Emissions Additive

The Vancouver Port Authority (VPA) and two container terminal operators
have completed a study with a private supplier to test a fuel additive designed
to reduce harmful air emissions in land-based container handling equipment.
Results of the study indicate the additive significantly reduced particulate
matter, nitrogen oxides and carbon monoxide emissions and generated improvements
in combustion efficiency. CombustAll, produced by Vancouver-based Catalyst
Energy Inc., is a chemical catalyst added to diesel or heavy bunker fuel to
increase the combustion efficiency of engines and boilers. CombustAll works
to improve combustion efficiency by catalyzing the oxidation of hydrocarbon
molecules further to completion. Improved efficiency not only extracts additional
energy from each unit of fuel but reduces several airborne pollutants such
as carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, volatile organic compounds and particulate
matter. The Port of Vancouver is participating with U.S. West Coast ports
and Canadian and U.S. regulatory agencies in the West Coast Diesel Emissions
Reduction Collaborative (WCDERC) to seek solutions to reduce air emissions
resulting from port operations. The WCDERC is announcing similar projects
and initiatives to reduce air emissions in California, Oregon and Washington.

Seattle PISeattle Post Intelligencer

Friday, October 1, 2004
Cruise
Ships to Plug in to Reduce Pollution:
Using
Dock Power Is Part of Regional Plan

Air pollution caused by cruise ships docking in Seattle
is expected to be reduced by one-third by plugging Princess Cruises’
ships into dockside electrical outlets instead of powering the
ships by running their diesel engines, officials said yesterday. "Reducing diesel emissions will decrease the
incidents of asthma and improve overall air quality," said Ron Kreizenbeck,
acting regional administrator for the Environmental Protection Agency
in Seattle.  

KPLU Seattle 88.5KPLU Seattle 88.5
Friday, October 1, 2004
MP3
audio link – NPR Pacific Lutheran University Seattle

The first steps are being taken to clean up one of the region’s most
overlooked sources of air pollution — the ships that dock in the Port of
Seattle. KPLU environment reporter Steve Krueger has the story.

Friday, October 1, 2004
MP3
audio link – NPR Pacific Lutheran University Seattle

The first steps are being taken to clean up the air over the Port
of Seattle. As KPLU environment reporter Steve Krueger explains, the
smoke that comes from marine vessels is a key source of the region’s
air pollution problems.

MarineLog.comMarineLog.com
Friday, October 1, 2004
Princess
Goes to Shore Power in
Seattle
Princess Cruises will turn off the engines of its ships when
they dock in Seattle next summer and "plug in" to the city’s
electric utility, which relies on hydroelectric power. The shore
power project, similar to an arrangement Princess started in the city
of Juneau in 2001, is designed to help reduce air emissions. Announced
yesterday as part of the West Coast Diesel Emissions Reductions Collaborative,
the program will enable Princess ships in Seattle to operate with
power provided by Seattle City Light. The power will travel to the
ship from a specially designed transformer designed to supply electricity
to run all onboard services during the day-long calls. "This
initiative is being made possible through a unique collaboration
of public and private entities, the availability of cost-effective
hydroelectric power ashore, and the fact that the technology exists
on our Alaska bound ships which piloted this program," said Dean
Brown, executive vice president, fleet operations for Princess Cruises
and chairman of Princess Tours. "We are very pleased to be able
to bring the shore power program to Seattle, and do our part to reduce
fuel consumption."

Seattle TimesSeattle Times
Thursday, September 30, 2004
Voluntary
Plan Aimed at Cutting Emissions

Federal regulators and industry today are expected to announce $6
million worth of cooperative, voluntary measures to reduce cancer-causing
diesel emissions from sources as varied as farm equipment and ships. In Seattle,
Princess Cruises plans to dramatically curb air pollution from its two biggest
passenger ships by plugging them into the electrical grid rather than have
them continue to idle while in port. The announcements are part of an initiative
sponsored by the Environmental Protection Agency, air-pollution authorities
and the states of California, Washington and Oregon. They’re working with
industry and hope to secure $100 million over five years for other projects
to cut dangerous diesel exhaust.

Longview Daily NewsThe Longview WA Daily News
Thursday,
September 30, 2004

Environmental officials launched a partnership with industry Wednesday
to curb cancer-causing diesel emissions spewing into the West
Coast’s skies. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced $6
million worth of voluntary projects in California, Oregon and Washington,
with most of the money coming from the federal government. The EPA said
it hoped to ultimately secure $100 million over five years for future
projects.

Governor Locke Speech Seattle WA
Thursday,
September 30, 2004

Thank you Linda [Strout, Deputy CEO for the Port] for that kind introduction.
It is great to be here today on the Seattle waterfront. Our waterways
represent a great opportunity for both recreation and commerce here in Washington.
We have container ships sending overseas Washington products. And we also
have cruise ships docking with passengers from all over the world who have
a chance to shop at our stores and restaurants and visit our state. But with
this great opportunity also comes challenges. Challenges to keep our environment
clean and our residents safe from harmful pollution.

Princess CruisesPrincess Cruises
Thursday, September 30, 2004
Press
Release — Princess Ships to Connect to Shore Power in Seattle
for 2005 Summer Season

Line Expands Innovative Program to Reduce Air Emissions. Demonstrating
Princess’ commitment to operate responsibly in the communities in
which it does business, Princess will turn off the engines of its
ships when they dock in Seattle next summer and "plug in" to
the city’s electric utility, which relies on hydroelectric power.
This unique shore power project, similar to an arrangement Princess
started in the city of Juneau in 2001, is designed to help reduce
air emissions. Announced today as part of the West Coast Diesel Emissions
Reductions Collaborative, the program will enable Princess ships
in Seattle to operate with power provided by Seattle City Light. The
power will travel to the ship from a specially designed transformer
designed to supply electricity to run all onboard services during
the day-long calls.

   
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